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ELAR_5_8

Page history last edited by Ruth Nicole Hall 5 years, 10 months ago

5th-Grade English Language Arts and Reading TEKS 

 

Lesson Title:  Using Sensory Language Imagery to Infer Themes in Poetry

Created and Submitted by: Ruth Nicole Hall 

School Name: School of Library and Information Studies 

District: Texas Woman’s University 

Roles: Lesson Written for Coteaching between an ELA-R Classroom Teacher and School Librarian 

 

Grade Level: 5th Grade

 

Lesson Plan Objectives:

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

1. Identify and record sensory language from “Gussie’s Greasy Spoon” in The New Kid on the Block by Jack Prelutsky.

2. Record evidence from the text to show their understanding of imagery in poetry.

3. Infer a theme based on evidence from the text and background knowledge.

 

ELA-R TEKS:

(8) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to evaluate the impact of sensory details, imagery, and figurative language in literary text.

 

Other Content Area(s) Addressed:

Technology (for the Extension)

 

Standards for the 21st-Century Learner Indicators

2.1.5- Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems.

3.1.4- Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess. (For the Extension)

4.1.3- Respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres.

 

Classroom Teacher – School Librarian(s) Collaboration:

  1. Classroom teacher and school librarian design or find a previously designed graphic organizer for recording sensory imagery and inferences.
  2. The school librarian provides a copy of The New Kid on the Block and will flag poems involving food. (See list below.)
  3. Both educators secure additional copies of the text as needed for the lesson.
  4. Both educators introduce the text and poems involving food and co-model completing the graphic organizer.
  5. Both educators monitor students’ guided practice.
  6. Both educators assess the students’ learning outcomes.

 

Measurable Outcome or Final Product: The students will learn to infer by using their background knowledge and evidence from a poem. The students will use the sensory list poem graphic organizer to record five different sensory images from the text. The students will also use the evidence—background knowledge—inference category matrix graphic organizer to record inferences and infer a theme for the poem. Educators will use both graphic organizers as an assessment instrument. Educators will also use a poem checklist as an assessment instrument in the extension.

 

Assessment Tool(s):

  1. Sensory List Poem Graphic Organizer
  2. Evidence–Background Knowledge–Inference Category Matrix Graphic Organizer
  3. Poem Checklist (.doc) (for the Extension)

 

Resources: Include appropriate print, electronic, and Web-based resources to meet the learning objective(s).

  1. The New Kid on the Block by Jack Prelutsky (Greenwillow Books, 1984)
  2. Computer/Document Camera
  3. 4.1 Sensory List Poem Graphic Organizer (Moreillon, 2013)
  4. 6.3 Evidence–Background Knowledge–Inference Category Matrix Graphic Organizer (Moreillon, 2013) – Both downloadable from: http://tinyurl.com/crcsesl-ala-extras
  5. www.storybird.com (for the Extension)  

 

Total Estimated Lesson Time: 50 minutes 

 

Estimated Lesson Time: Part One—15 minutes

 

Instructional Plan Outline: Part One

 

Preparation

1. Educators display The New Kid on the Block on the document camera.

2. Educators distribute one Sensory List Poem Graphic Organizer to each student face down.

3. Educators post and review the lesson objectives.

 

Motivation 

4. Educators play (approximately 1 minute) of “Chinese Food” music video by Alison Gold - http://bit.ly/1eUnwFp

5. Educators ask: “What are your five senses?”

6. Educators explain that authors use descriptive language that appeals to the five senses in order to help readers understand their work. When writers use descriptive language that appeals to the senses, it is called imagery. 

 

Presentation

7. Educators introduce and read “Gussie’s Greasy Spoon” (page 76) to students asking them to listen carefully for words related to the five senses.

8. Educators ask students if they hear any words related to the five senses.

9. Educators display Sensory List Poem Graphic Organizer and ask students to turn over their graphic organizers.

10. Educators re-read the poem and model think alouds to demonstrate identifying sensory imagery in the poem.

11. Educators model taking turns to record imagery on the graphic organizer. (One example for each sensory image—at the most five times.)

12. Educators display “I’d Never Eat a Beet” (page 124) on the document camera.

 

Guided Practice

13. Students work in small groups to identify and record sensory images they can see, hear, touch, smell, and taste on a second Sensory List Poem Graphic Organizer.

14. Educators monitor the students as they identify and record sensory images in their small groups.

 

Closure

15. Educators ask the students to share their sensory images and the sense to which it appeals from “I’d Never Eat a Beet.”

16. Educators ask and the students think-pair-share. 1. “What is sensory imagery?” 2. “Why do writers use sensory imagery?”

 

Assessment

17. The educators review the students’ graphic organizers to see if they should follow up with additional instruction. 

 

Instructional Plan Outline: Part Two

 

Estimated Lesson Time: Part Two - 35 minutes

 

Preparation

1. Educators display “Gussie’s Greasy Spoon” with the document camera (page 76 from The New Kid on the Block).

2. Educators distribute one Evidence–Background Knowledge–Inference Category Matrix Graphic Organizer to each student.

3. Educators post and review learning objectives.

4. Educators post Background Knowledge + Evidence in the Text = Inference (Educated Guess Found “Between the Lines”).

 

Motivation

5. Educators play (approximately 2 minutes) of the music video “Kids Eating Healthy Sing-a-long” by CaptnDavesAdventure:  http://bit.ly/18JOH6t

6. Educators ask, “What inferences can you make from the video?” 

7. Educators say, “Let’s read between the lines in ‘Gussie’s Greasy Spoon.’”

Presentation

8. Educators say, “Readers infer meaning or draw conclusions from a poem (a text) by reading between the lines and combining your background knowledge with evidence in the poem (the text).”

9. Educators read “Gussie’s Greasy Spoon” and model think alouds to demonstrate how to infer.

10. Educators model composing a one-sentence theme for this poem.

 

Guided Practice 

11. Students work with partners to record background knowledge and evidence (on their graphic organizers) from a different poem selected from a menu of poems about food.

12. Students work individually to make a one-sentence theme for their selected poem.

13. Educators monitor to assess student progress and understanding.

 

Closure

14. Educators ask the students to share the title of the poem and their one-sentence themes with their partner.

15. Educators ask and students think-pair-share, 1. “How do you make an inference?” 2. “How do sensory imagery and inferences help you understand the text better?”

 

Assessment

16. The educators review the students’ graphic organizers to see if they should follow up with additional instruction.

 

Extensions

17. The classroom teacher will divide students into small groups (two or three in a group). The groups of students will write a poem using imagery, poetry techniques (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia), and/or figurative language (e.g., similes and metaphors) using different types of foods.  

18. The students will collaborate to build a class eBook of poems on Storybird. (http://www.storybird.com/) The students will categorize poems based on food themes they develop. The students illustrate their poems with original images, copyright free images, or images provided by Storybird illustrators.  

19. The classroom teacher will read aloud Locomotion by Jacqueline Woodson (G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 2003), and students will read Peace, Locomotion by Jacqueline Woodson (G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 2009) in literature circles. These novels-in-verse use sensory imagery.

 

ELAR_5_8 Lesson Plan (.pdf)

 

Evidence-Background Knowledge-Inference Example (.doc)

 

List of Food Poems (.doc)

 

Sensory List Poem Checklist (.doc)

 

Sensory List Poem Graphic Organizer Example (.doc)

 

 

 

 

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